The changing face of Cork City

Cork City’s neighbourhoods have survived floods, famine, civil war and the burning of the city. As we learn to live with Covid-19 and Brexit, Darragh Bermingham investigates how these unique historic areas are coping with change. 

Neighbourhoods across Cork City have changed in recent years, with many welcoming new residents and businesses and others combatting dereliction and the loss of its younger population to the suburbs.

The effects of the Covid-19 pandemic and Brexit have been felt in areas across Cork and Ireland, with the full impact from both still unknown in many cases, but anecdotal and property sales evidence suggest a movement of people from Dublin to other parts of Ireland during the pandemic. 

The population of Cork City increased from about 119,000 in 2011 to almost 125,000 in 2016 – this has increased since then, particularly as a result of the boundary extension.

In the last number of years, Cork City has seen its school population grow, with new schools also established to cater for demand.

However, with a national housing crisis currently ongoing and dereliction rampant in some areas, the struggle to find accommodation and housing has been felt in Cork City.

Darragh Bermingham: ‘Residents and business owners in Cork City’s most vibrant neighbourhoods are finding reasons to be optimistic as the city looks towards the future.’

There are currently almost 100 derelict sites on the derelict sites register, according to Cork City Council.

Key neighbourhoods across the city, including the likes of South Parish, Middle Parish, St Luke’s and Sunday’s Well have all seen change in recent years, with population growth, new schools or the amalgamation of existing ones, business closures and openings and a fight against dereliction.

With Cork and Ireland emerging from lockdown and Covid-19 restrictions, it remains to be seen how neighbourhoods across the city cope with the effects of the pandemic, Brexit, the ongoing housing crisis and globalisation.

However, residents and business owners in Cork City’s most vibrant neighbourhoods are finding reasons to be optimistic as the city looks towards the future.

South Parish 

Cork’s oldest parish has been rejuvenated and revitalised in recent years with the arrival of Nano Nagle Place, transformations of derelict sites and work by local businesses and residents to make the area more of a destination than a thoroughfare.

Around the time of the financial crash, South Parish saw the closure of the South Presentation Primary School, signalling that the area had seen the last of its young families and was now dominated by an older population.

The South Presentation building itself was left mostly unused and derelict sites across the area gave Cork’s first parish a run-down air.

However, recent years have seen the parish rejuvenated, with a fresh mix of youth and the elderly among its residents, new and exciting businesses, and a growth in population and school numbers.

Between 2011 and 2016, the population in South Parish and surrounding area rose from about 7,300 to almost 7,800 and it is thought this has risen since.

Cllr Mick Finn and South Parish resident Agnes O'Sullivan.
Cllr Mick Finn and South Parish resident Agnes O’Sullivan.

“There’s been phenomenal change in the last 10 years,” explained Agnes O’Sullivan, a resident of South Parish for the past 20 years, who works in Nano Nagle Place.

There has been this growth of a new community of businesses and residents that has brought life into this part of the city.

“I was born in the South Parish back in the 1960s and we left when I was around two but I returned here almost 20 years ago back to the parish and it was the best thing I ever did,” she added.

Central to this rejuvenation has been Nano Nagle Place, which took over the derelict South Presentation site and transformed it into one of the city’s must-see destinations.

Shane Clarke, chief executive of Nano Nagle Place: 'We brought people up to the area who may never have been before.'
Shane Clarke, chief executive of Nano Nagle Place: ‘We brought people up to the area who may never have been before.’

“I would like to think that we brought some change,” said Shane Clarke, chief executive of Nano Nagle Place.

“We brought people up to the area who may never have been before.” 

Local independent councillor Mick Finn agreed that Nano Nagle Place has played an integral role in the revitalisation of South Parish.

Rosie O’Toole enjoying the wildflower meadow at Nano Nagle Place. Picture: Clare Keogh
Rosie O’Toole enjoying the wildflower meadow at Nano Nagle Place. Picture: Clare Keogh

“One of the big things that has happened in the South Parish area is the transformation of the derelict South Pres convent into Nano Nagle Place and the School of Architecture,” he said.

“That has breathed new life into the area over the last while and has probably been the most significant change alongside maybe the housing development on White St.

“The Douglas Street Business Association [DBSA] has also done great work and that was supported by the physical changes in the parish which have brought people together.” 

Chair of Douglas Street Business Association and owner of Cork Flower Studio on Douglas Street Justine Looney: 'The business association formed in 2017 – we were tired of the nature of some spaces and the antisocial behaviour going on.' Picture: Jim Coughlan
Chair of Douglas Street Business Association and owner of Cork Flower Studio on Douglas Street Justine Looney: ‘The business association formed in 2017 – we were tired of the nature of some spaces and the antisocial behaviour going on.’ Picture: Jim Coughlan

Chair of DBSA and owner of the Cork Flower Studio on Douglas St Justine Looney also highlighted the role that local businesses played in the rejuvenation of the area.

“The business association formed in 2017 – we were tired of the nature of some spaces and the antisocial behaviour going on,” she explained.

“We got together, made a plan and got stuck in.

“We cleaned the area, started reporting antisocial behaviour and encouraged other businesses and residents to get involved,” she added.

“Then came the street festival in October 2018, our first Autumnfest, which was a massive success.

“The area has been really on the up since then and we’ve had great buy-in from local residents and businesses.

Cork Flower Studio was the backdrop for Cork City’s first parklet, which aimed to provide a green, social space for locals and tourists alike.

“It has seen Douglas St become more of a destination for people, rather than a thoroughfare to get to the city,” Justine explained.

There are still a number of vacant sites in South Parish including 118, 119 and 52 Barrack St and others on St Finbarr’s Place, Georges Quay and at 21 Evergreen St.

However, Agnes O’Sullivan explained that large-scale dereliction in the area seems to be a thing of the past.

“There’s been an injection of life into the area and that has tackled dereliction,” she said.

“There’s now a beautiful residential development on White St after the derelict car park was transformed.

Elizabeth Fort, Nano Nagle Place and Red Abbey have been brought back to life and that has rejuvenated the area.” 

Along with rejuvenated buildings, the area has seen an influx of new and exciting businesses from the likes of Michelin-starred Japanese takeaway Miyazaki to Palestinian-owned Izz Cafe.

“It’s really suited to independent businesses because there’s a great artsy vibe and it’s close to the city centre but without the really high rent,” said Justine Looney.

“People are really drawn to the area and there’s a great history here.” 

The South Parish has also seen a rise in its population in recent years, with the latest census figures showing an increase of about 600 people.

“There’s a great mix among the community now, from young renters to older people and families in between,” Justine added.

That influx has also had a positive impact on school numbers, with more children attending local schools.

“We have seen growth in school numbers in the area as well,” said Cllr Finn.

“Coláiste Éaman Rís, formerly Deerpark, has gone co-ed and has seen its numbers go up, St Mary’s of the Isle has seen its numbers go up and it seems there are more families and migrant communities living in the area, which is having that positive knock-on effect for schools.” 

Coláiste Éaman Rís is expecting to take in 480 students this coming academic term, almost double what it took in 2011. Nearby St Aloysius Girls School and St Marie of the Isle have also seen their school body increase in recent years, with about 310 students enrolled by each school in 2019.

However, there is still work to do to ensure South Parish builds on its potential as a tourist destination and makes use of its full potential, according to both residents and business owners.

Green spaces and traffic management were top of the list in terms of priorities for local residents and businesses, according to a recent survey by the DSBA.

“We did a survey of the residents last summer and we’re working with the council to get some requests put through,” explained Justine.

“We’d really like it to be more pedestrianised and we’d like a one-way system in the meantime.

“We also want more plants and trees as that’s something that is definitely lacking,” she added.

“It’s what the residents want – more bike parking, more pedestrian friendly facilities.

“It would be great to have the infrastructure more people-focused because the community is people-focused.” 

Middle Parish 

St Peter's, North Main St, Cork. Picture: Denis Minihane
St Peter’s, North Main St, Cork. Picture: Denis Minihane

Middle Parish is the heart of Cork city, but despite the desire for city centre living, dereliction remains an issue for businesses and residents in the area.

The Middle Parish area has seen its population increase from about 2,500 in 2011 to more than 2,900 in 2016.

The surge in population was met with demand for a new primary school and, in recent years, the Educate Together National School opened on Grattan St. The school took in 209 students in 2019.

Meanwhile, nearby Presentation Brothers Secondary School saw its numbers rise from 662 in 2011 to 713 in 2019.

Despite the increase in population and evident desire among people, especially young city-based workers, to live close to the city centre, Middle Parish has seen more than its fair share of dereliction in recent times.

The derelict sites register shows about 20 derelict buildings in the area, including 93/94 North Main St, which has a value of about €500,000, and the Kyrl’s Quay site, which is valued at €1.9m.

Looking at North Main St alone, numbers 62, 63 and 65 along with 93 through to 96, are all registered on the derelict sites register.

Frank O’Connor and Jude Sherry have been highlighting dereliction in and around Cork City for over a year, including several sites in the Middle Parish area.

“It’s disappointing to see so many derelict properties so close to the city centre,” said Frank.

There’s a severe housing crisis here at the moment and it’s surprising to see such dereliction when there is such demand.

“North Main St and the surrounding areas have been hit pretty hard with dereliction and long-term vacancies,” he added.

Jude explained further: “The city centre island is pretty bad for such a high land value location.

“It’s so surprising to see such dereliction and long-term vacancy so close to the city centre, particularly when you think of the economic value of these locations.

“You’d somewhat expect to see it on the outskirts of towns or villages but never to that extent in a city centre,” she said.

Kevin O’Brien of guerilla urban artists group Mad About Cork explained: “There are far too many buildings lying in ruin – former homes as well as former businesses and not just buildings but large sites like the old Munster Furniture Store, the old timber yard on Kyrl’s Quay, the old Dunnes Stores building.

“Plans might be afoot for some of the sites but progress with derelict sites and buildings comes far too slowly and that’s as true for the rest of the city as it is for the Middle Parish.

“There have also been a few notable business closures in the last decade or so, Dunnes Stores being the biggest,” added Kevin.

George Patterson, chairman, Middle Parish Community Association and Centre, Cork, in front of the centre, which features a mural of the Burning of Cork in 1920. Picture: Denis Minihane
George Patterson, chairman, Middle Parish Community Association and Centre, Cork, in front of the centre, which features a mural of the Burning of Cork in 1920. Picture: Denis Minihane

Middle Parish resident George Patterson explained the opening of the Coal Quay bridge had an impact on business in the Middle Parish area, highlighting the closure of the local Dunnes Stores in 2016.

“It meant people from the northside could come into the city but that they wouldn’t have to come up North Main St, which did have an impact on the business and trade.”

“That didn’t do any favours to North Main St and the surrounding area,” he said. “The area isn’t really as booming as it could be or should be.” 

However, despite the dereliction, there is hope among the business community and residents in the area for the future for Middle Parish.

Cork City Council moved in recent weeks to somewhat alleviate the dereliction issue in the area, after the local authority formally began the legal process to acquire the adjoining buildings at 62, 63, 64 and 65 North Main St under Section 14 of the Derelict Sites Act 1990.

A growing body of independent businesses in the area, which has seen some streets pedestrianised in recent months, is also cause for optimism.

“Lots of independent traders have been operating on the street for years – Tony’s Bistro, Cummins Sports, Mr Bradley’s, to name a few – while more have opened in recent years – Tom Winter’s Barbers, Priory Coffee, the Bigger Picture,” said Kevin O’Brien.

The independent shops really add a unique sense of character to the area.” 

Isobelle O’Mahony of St Peter’s on North Main St said there has been “substantial positive change” in the area in recent years.

“It’s become more of a social community area,” she said, highlighting the positive impact of the North Main Street Traders Association.

“I think it was very much left alone for quite a while but a lot of us on the street worked together to make the place a little bit more accessible and friendly.

“There’s a great sense of community about it, and so many more people live here than you’d originally think.

“There’s constantly some new business popping up as well,” she added.

“We have the likes of Bradley’s, of course, and we have the tattoo studio, which brings a new clientele to the area.

“It’s definitely moving forward in a nice way. It’s no longer what people may have thought it was – a dark place to go to – it’s definitely got a life of its own.” 

George Patterson highlighted the positive impact of recent apartment developments and his hopes for a similar impact from proposed student accommodation in the area.

BMOR Developments was recently given the green light to build accommodation to house nearly 280 students on North Main St.

“When that goes up, it should bring prosperity to the area,” said George, who added that, since reopening in recent weeks, there is a buzz in the Middle Parish area.

“Since reopening, it all looks very fruitful.

Because nobody is going on foreign holidays, the area is inundated with locals and holidaymakers.

“So business seems to be good and there’s a nice, light air about the place,” he added. 

“North Main St seems to be, not a hive of activity or anything, but certainly busier.” 

Kevin O’Brien, meanwhile, highlighted the resilient nature of the area as it leaves lockdown.

“I suppose like most areas in the city, things aren’t normal as we slowly come out of lockdown and it’s hard to judge where things are at,” he said.

“But the Middle Parish has always been resilient.

“You’ve got residents who have lived there their entire lives and independent businesses that have survived for decades.” 

Isobelle O’Mahony admitted that things in the area are constantly changing but that there is positivity in the air in the Middle Parish.

“Things are constantly changing and we’re still finding our feet but I’d like to think the future is positive for the area.

“People are trying to help each other out and there’s a real sense of community, particularly after Covid closures.

This community was so prominent in our lives until Covid came along and we almost didn’t realise until we got back to it, but this really is what we’re all about.

“People are making such an effort and it really shows how much people love this area and this city.” 

Sunday’s Well 

Sunday’s Well, a heritage-rich part of Cork city, is starting to regain its vibrancy, according to residents and business owners.

The area has seen a population increase in recent years, along with a reduction in derelict properties and increased school numbers, and has seen its population grow from about 1,300 in 2011 to almost 1,600 in 2016, with further increases expected since then.

Director of the Cork Life Centre on Winter's Hill Don O’Leary: 'Sundays Well is part of the heritage of Cork City and was once seen as one of the more elite places for people to live in Cork City' Picture: Dan Linehan
Director of the Cork Life Centre on Winter’s Hill Don O’Leary: ‘Sundays Well is part of the heritage of Cork City and was once seen as one of the more elite places for people to live in Cork City’ Picture: Dan Linehan

The Cork Life Centre is based on Winter’s Hill in Sunday’s Well in a building that epitomises the historical importance of the area, according to the director of the centre, Don O’Leary.

“Sundays Well is part of the heritage of Cork City and was once seen as one of the more elite places for people to live in  Cork City,” he explained.

“When I started here in 2006, every one of the nearby bungalows were owned by families and you knew all the families.

“Over time, a lot of the parents might have passed away and the houses were either let out to people or were sold.

“But now we have some families coming back into the area, even if they are renting because of the current climate,” he added.

“It’s a great location so close to the city.” 

While it is a strategic location, a lack of suitable infrastructure has seen Sunday’s Well unable to welcome large-scale building developments to the area.

The Good Shepherd convent site had been slated for the development of 182 apartments and 20 houses but residents in the area claimed the locality did not have the infrastructure to support it.

Further up the road, however, the landmark St Kevin’s hospital site has been approved for the development of 266 homes.

Don explained that, despite a recent problem with dereliction, the area has been able to maintain its historic architecture and unique style.

“There was a bit of dereliction starting to appear and it’s great to see that being tackled,” he said.

That’s why it’s great to see young people and young families coming back into the area. The architecture of these terraces is fantastic, all the way along Sunday’s Well Road.

“We wouldn’t want to see this unique area fall into disrepair.

“There hasn’t been the same rush to modernise Sunday’s Well,” he added. 

“Infrastructure wouldn’t allow it – there’s a two-way system but it’s a nightmare.

“When these roads were built, it would have been horse and cart on them. Despite the traffic in the area, that vibrancy and sense of community is coming back and that bodes well for the future.” 

Ruth Peters, a German native who has been living in Ireland for the past 20 years, moved to Sunday’s Well over a decade ago.

She too has noticed a change in the area in recent times.

“More people have certainly moved into the street I’m on in recent years,” she said.

“When I moved in, the two houses next to me were empty and there were lots of empty houses.

“It’s certainly one thing I’ve noticed, a lot of people moving in and doing up houses.

“There are a few houses that have been empty for years and years with difficulties in finding the owners or getting them to do anything with them,” she added.

“But there seems to be less of that now, many of the houses are done up and occupied.

Ruth believes it is great for the area and for the city in general to see once-empty houses occupied once more.

Despite the influx of people, new businesses have been hard to come by in Sunday’s Well in recent years.

“We have lost a few businesses over the years, particularly a few pubs,” Don explained.

“Hairdressers have opened up but closed shortly after and a number of pubs have closed,” Ruth added.

Shane Long, founder and owner of the Franciscan Well Bar and Brewery: 'There is a great community vibe here now and we see ourselves as central to that as most local residents come to our venue,'
Shane Long, founder and owner of the Franciscan Well Bar and Brewery: ‘There is a great community vibe here now and we see ourselves as central to that as most local residents come to our venue,’

However, Shane Long, founder and owner of the Franciscan Well Bar and Brewery based in Sunday’s Well, said things appear to be changing for the better in that regard.

“Take for example the friary at the top of our street,” he said.

“That has changed hands on a lease basis 11 times since I’ve been in the North Mall.

“The guy who has it now, Mike Darcy, is a fantastic character who has gained a great following and I believe will be there for many years to come.

“People like him and Dave O’Leary have created an independent feel to this side of the river where they know every customer’s name and really care about how they do business.” 

Shane admitted the situation in Sunday’s Well was not ideal when he took over the Franciscan Well back in 1998.

“At that time, the area was very rundown, with very few owner-occupiers and most houses were broken up into bedsits,” he said.

Looking at the situation in Sunday’s Well now, Shane added things have “totally changed”. 

We would like to think we have contributed to the positive change along with the City Council’s regeneration plan, which gave generous tax incentives for investment into the houses along the mall,” he said.

There was an issue with dereliction but not really any more and this is down to two things – the Government tax incentive and the fantastic people by and large that have moved into the area in the past 10 years or so.

There is a great community vibe here now and we see ourselves as central to that as most local residents come to our venue,” he added.  

There are still a number of derelict properties in the area, including the Good Shepherd Convent, a site on 62 Blarney Street and at nearby Summerville on Winter’s Hill.

However, the recently deconsecrated Sunday’s Well church is being used by the music department at University College Cork in what is a coup for the area, according to Don O’Leary.

“That’s bringing in young people to the area and it’s great to see such an iconic building being used in this way,” he said.

Sixth class pupils from Sunday's Well Boys National School Scott Creed Guiney, Dylan Ugbelesa and Sean Fahy. The school is to amalgamate with Sunday's Well Girls to form one co-ed school. Picture: Jim Coughlan.
Sixth class pupils from Sunday’s Well Boys National School Scott Creed Guiney, Dylan Ugbelesa and Sean Fahy. The school is to amalgamate with Sunday’s Well Girls to form one co-ed school. Picture: Jim Coughlan.

There have also been developments in terms of national schools in the area in just the last few weeks with the amalgamation of Sunday’s Well Boys National School (BNS) and Sunday’s Well Girls to form one co-ed school.

Both schools had seen increases in their student populations in recent years.

In 2011, both schools took in 150 students or fewer. In 2019, however, both schools enrolled 180 students or more.

“School numbers have been consistently growing in the area,” said Don. “That shows that the area is starting to regain some of its vibrancy.

“You do worry that with the housing crisis and with the dereliction in the area, that a lot of the houses would have been rented.

“There’s nothing wrong with rented accommodation but it would be great to see families owning those homes and being able to stay there for generations.

“It would create a real sense of community that could last.

“Even still, there’s now a great mixture now of older people who have lived here all their lives along with younger families and renters.

“There is an awful lot of history here and it’s great that it can be passed on.” 

St Luke’s 

The St Luke’s area in Cork City is like its own little village supported by local businesses and a vibrant art scene, according to residents and business owners in the area.

The area’s population grew from about 5,200 in 2011 to 5,800 in 2016, and secondary school numbers in the area have also seen a surge in that time.

The Cork Educate Together Secondary School, which opened in 2016, took in 310 students in 2020 while the number of students in surrounding schools such as Christian Brothers College and Scoil Mhuire either rose or remained consistent.

At primary school level, however, both St Patrick’s Boys and St Patrick’s Girls National Schools saw a slight decline in numbers between 2011 and 2019.

The girls school took in 241 students in 2011 but its enrolment fell to 175 in 2019 while the boys school took in five fewer students in 2019 when compared to 2011.

The area, which has little to no dereliction at present, is home to a variety of residents, from young city workers to an older population and families in between.

Ruth Cagney, and Anth Kaley, owners of Rant in St Luke's Cork: 'Most of the businesses are owned by people who live in the area so that kind of helps that people have a vested interest in the community.' Picture: Eddie O'Hare
Ruth Cagney, and Anth Kaley, owners of Rant in St Luke’s Cork: ‘Most of the businesses are owned by people who live in the area so that kind of helps that people have a vested interest in the community.’ Picture: Eddie O’Hare

“It is very much so its own village and community and that has come about through different initiatives and events in the neighbourhood,” explained Ruth Cagney, St Luke’s resident and owner of Rant cafe.

“There’s a great community here with an artsy, bohemian feel to it and it doesn’t happen by accident – it takes effort from everyone to be neighbourly, look out for each other and create that neighbourhood feeling.

Most of the businesses are owned by people who live in the area so that kind of helps that people have a vested interest in the community.

“The male choir, which my husband runs, brings 50 or so men together every year to raise funds for Marymount, which used to be located here,” she added.

“The choir rehearses in St Luke’s and sings at Christmas for everyone and that in itself has brought people together.

“We also had an art exhibition at Henchy’s pub for the last 15 years because the neighbourhood itself used to support a children’s home in Cambodia. The children from that home are now all grown up and have housing and an education thanks to the exhibition.

“That again brought the community together and it highlighted the area as a little village in itself.” 

Ruth also highlighted the importance of St Luke’s retaining its post office in recent times, something that some areas in Cork were not so lucky with.

“Keeping the post office at the cross has been absolutely pivotal as well,” she said.

“It’s used by everyone in everyday life and it’s a hub of activity, so keeping that was huge for the area.” 

Eugene Sheehan opened Sheehan’s Butchers in St Luke’s in 1992, making his establishment one of the oldest in the area: 'There’s been a lot of big changes since then.' Picture: Larry Cummins.
Eugene Sheehan opened Sheehan’s Butchers in St Luke’s in 1992, making his establishment one of the oldest in the area: ‘There’s been a lot of big changes since then.’ Picture: Larry Cummins.

Eugene Sheehan opened Sheehan’s Butchers in St Luke’s in 1992, making his establishment one of the oldest in the area.

“There’s been a lot of big changes since then,” he laughed.

“The cross is coming back I think as an area.

“It’s kind of like a little village up here and all the businesses and the locals are really driving the area forward.

“We have the wine tavern, Henchy’s bar and the coffee shop all doing outdoor dining at the moment and there’s a great buzz around,” he added.

“I think the area is coming back strong again.

“Business is positive here at the moment.

“Since Covid in particular, people have been great at supporting local and it’s hugely appreciated on our end.” 

As well as retaining its older businesses, St Luke’s has seen an influx of new business in recent times.

Rant Cafe itself opened in the past five years and the famous toll booth at the cross is getting another lease of life thanks to a South African fast food venture.

Local chef Chris Prinsloo recently opened Gazbo, a new street food pop-up in the toll booth at St Luke’s Cross.

Gazbo offers dishes that involve a hollowed-out loaf of bread filled with curry, a South African dish with an Indian twist.

The toll booth, which was built around 1880, is an integral part of the St Luke’s landscape and locals are delighted to see its continued use.

Director of sales and marketing at the nearby Montenotte Hotel Ray Kelleher said there is a genuine sense of community and a strong business ethos in the St Luke’s area.

The hotel itself has seen investment of close to €8m since 2016 and more developments are in the pipeline for the popular destination, a reflection of the St Luke’s area.

“There’s a genuine feeling to the area with a little bit of bohemian there too,” said Ray. “It’s quite residential and there’s a lot of diverse nationalities in the area.

“The likes of the Live at St Luke’s venue has probably added to that bohemian vibe because it’s a brilliant, alternative music venue.

“It’s hugely important for the area and we can’t wait to see it back up and running. There’s a strong business ethos to the area as well,” he added.

There are some great local businesses in the area and being so close to the city centre, that’s very important.

“Having the likes of Cork Chamber, CareChoice, Cope Foundation, Griffith College and more is huge for the area. It suggests that it’s not just a residential area but a strong business area as well.

“From a leisure perspective, there’s also Henchy’s pub, which has outdoor dining now, and the likes of St Luke’s on our doorstep.

“The return of St Luke’s as a venue will be invaluable to the area because it really embodies the area.” 

The impact of Covid-19 has not dampened spirits in the local area but instead brought it together, according to Ray.

“This community has never been closer,” he said.

“I’m very hopeful for the future for not just the area but for Cork as a destination.

“I know Cork City Council is working on a new five-year action plan and the focus will be on retail, commercial, residential as well as attractions and amenities.

“We’re in a bit of a strange time at the moment but I think there is reason to be positive about the future.” 

Similar Articles

Comments

Most Popular

17 Kids Who Were Confused About Why Their Actions Made Their Parents Laugh So Hard

https://www.buzzfeed.com/asiawmclain/kids-who-accidentally-made-their-parents-laugh

REvil ransomware is back in full attack mode and leaking data – BleepingComputer

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/revil-ransomware-is-back-in-full-attack-mode-and-leaking-data/

A West Virginia city is taking a Tesla patrol car for a test drive – CNN

https://www.cnn.com/2021/09/11/us/tesla-police-car-west-virginia-trnd/index.html